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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 11, Issue 4, Pages 235-244
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0962935029000096

Inhibitory action of a macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin, on co-stimulatory molecule expressions in vitro and in vivo

1Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Showa University, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142–8555, Japan
2Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Showa University, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142–8555, Japan

Copyright © 2002 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective: The influence of a macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin (RXM), on co-stimulatory molecule expression was examined in vitro and in vivo.

Materials and methods: Spleen cells obtained from BALB/c mice 10 days after immunization with 8.0 μg of hemocyanin absorbed to 4.0 mg of aluminum hydroxide were cultured in the presence of 100.0 μg/ml of hemocyanin and various concentrations of RXM. We first examined the influence of RXM on cell activation by examining the proliferative response of cells and cytokine production. We also examined the influence of RXM on co-stimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80 and CD86) expressions on cultured splenic B-lymphocytes induced by in vitro antigenic stimulation using flow cytometry. In the second part of experiments, non-immunized and immunized mice were treated orally with 2.5 mg/kg of RXM once a day for 4 or 8 weeks. Splenic B lymphocytes were obtained from these mice 24 h after antigenic challenge, and co-stimulatory molecule expressions were examined by flow cytometer.

Results: Cell activation induced by in vitro antigenic stimulation was suppressed by RXM when cells were cultured in the presence of more than 5.0 μg/ml of the agent. Addition of RXM at a concentration of 5.0 μg/ml into cell cultures also suppressed co-stimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80 and CD86) expressions on splenic B lymphocytes, which was enhanced by antigenic stimulation in vitro. Oral RXM administration for 4 weeks clearly suppressed the enhancement of CD40 and CD86 (but not CD80) expressions on splenic B lymphocytes induced by antigenic stimulation in vivo. This suppressive activity of RXM on co-stimulatory molecule (CD40 and CD86) expressions was further strengthened by the treatment of mice for 8 weeks. Long-term treatment with oral RXM also suppressed CD80 expressions, which was not suppressed by 4-week treatment.

Conclusion: The present results suggest that RXM exerts its immunomodulating effects through suppression of both cell activation and co-stimulatory molecule expressions induced by antigenic stimulation. These suppressive activities of RXM might contribute, in part, to the therapeutic mode of action of RXM on inflammatory diseases.