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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2006, Article ID 71214, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/MI/2006/71214
Research Communication

NKT Cells in the Induced Sputum of Severe Asthmatics

1Department of Pediatric and Respiratory Diseases, Abderrahmane Mami Hospital, Pavillon B, Ariana 2080, Tunisia
2Homeostasis and Cell Dysfunction Unit Research 99/UR/08-40, Medicine University of Tunis, Tunis 1007, Tunisia

Received 24 October 2005; Accepted 9 December 2005

Copyright © 2006 Agnes Hamzaoui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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