Mediators of Inflammation

Mediators of Inflammation / 2007 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 030987 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/30987

Quratul Ann Hussain, Barry E. Sheehan, Ian J. McKay, Robert P. Allaker, "Antimicrobial Activity Does Not Predict Cytokine Response to Adrenomedullin or Its Shortened Derivatives", Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 2007, Article ID 030987, 4 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/30987

Antimicrobial Activity Does Not Predict Cytokine Response to Adrenomedullin or Its Shortened Derivatives

Received18 Jun 2007
Revised09 Jul 2007
Accepted05 Sep 2007
Published08 Oct 2007

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate cytokine release from oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts in response to AM and shortened derivatives previously characterised in terms of their antimicrobial activities. Cells were incubated with AM or its fragments (residues 1-12, 1-21, 13-52, 16-21, 16-52, 22-52, 26-52, and 34-52), and culture supernatants collected after 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours. A time-dependant increase in production of interleukin1-α and interleukin 1-β from keratinocytes in response to all peptides was demonstrated. However, exposure to fragments compared to whole AM resulted in reduced production of these cytokines (60% mean reduction at 24 hours, P<.001). No consistent differences were shown between the cytokine response elicited by antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial fragments. The production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 did not change significantly with time or peptide used. Fibroblast cells were relatively unresponsive to all treatments. This study demonstrates that antimicrobial activity does not predict cytokine response to adrenomedullin or its shortened derivatives.

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Copyright © 2007 Quratul Ann Hussain et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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