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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 367590, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/367590
Research Article

Effects of Nebivolol on Endothelial Gene Expression during Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

1Internal Medicine D, Department of Biomedical and Surgical Sciences, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy
2Preclinical Development Department, Menarini Ricerche Spa, Via Sette Santi 1, 50131 Firenze, Italy

Received 23 December 2007; Accepted 21 March 2008

Academic Editor: Hidde Bult

Copyright © 2008 Ulisse Garbin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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