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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2009, Article ID 287387, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/287387
Research Article

A Splice Variant of ASC Regulates IL-1 Release and Aggregates Differently from Intact ASC

1Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute on Aging and Adaptation, Graduate School of Medicine, Shinshu University, Negano 390-8621, Japan
2Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Shinshu University, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan
3Institute of Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka 997-0017, Japan

Received 11 March 2009; Revised 3 June 2009; Accepted 19 June 2009

Academic Editor: Changlin Li

Copyright © 2009 Kazuhiko Matsushita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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