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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2009, Article ID 391682, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/391682
Research Article

The Interaction of Oxidative Stress Response with Cytokines in the Thyrotoxic Rat: Is There a Link?

1Division of Pediatric Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, 35340 Inciralti, Izmir, Turkey
2Department of General Surgery, School of Medicine, Ege University, 35100 Izmir, Turkey
3Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, 09890 Aydin, Turkey
4Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Ege University, 35100 Izmir, Turkey

Received 28 September 2008; Revised 22 December 2008; Accepted 13 January 2009

Academic Editor: Sunit Kumar Singh

Copyright © 2009 Balahan Makay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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