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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2009, Article ID 405016, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/405016
Review Article

Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine-Mediated Anemia: Regarding Molecular Mechanisms of Erythropoiesis

Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du Cancer, Fondation de Recherche Cancer et Sang, Hôpital Kirchberg, 9 Rue Edward Steichen, 2540 Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Received 23 August 2009; Accepted 17 December 2009

Academic Editor: Rhian Touyz

Copyright © 2009 F. Morceau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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