Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2009, Article ID 535348, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/535348
Research Article

Substance P Increases Cell-Surface Expression of CD74 (Receptor for Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor): In Vivo Biotinylation of Urothelial Cell-Surface Proteins

1Research & Development Service, Bay Pines VA Healthcare System, VA Medical Center, Bay Pines, FL 33744, USA
2Department of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
3Research Service, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System; Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA
4Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA

Received 10 September 2008; Revised 2 December 2008; Accepted 7 January 2009

Academic Editor: Eeva Moilanen

Copyright © 2009 Katherine L. Meyer-Siegler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. G. Apodaca, E. Balestreire, and L. A. Birder, “The uroepithelial-associated sensory web,” Kidney International, vol. 72, no. 9, pp. 1057–1064, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. K. L. Meyer-Siegler, K. A. Iczkowski, and P. L. Vera, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is increased in the urine of patients with urinary tract infection: macrophage migration inhibitory factor-protein complexes in human urine,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 175, no. 4, pp. 1523–1528, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. K. L. Meyer-Siegler, R. C. Ordorica, and P. L. Vera, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is upregulated in an endotoxin-induced model of bladder inflammation in rats,” Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 55–63, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. K. L. Meyer-Siegler and P. L. Vera, “Substance P induced release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor from rat bladder epithelium,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 171, no. 4, pp. 1698–1703, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. J. A. Baugh and R. Bucala, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor,” Critical Care Medicine, vol. 30, supplement 1, pp. S27–S35, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  6. J. Nishihira, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): its essential role in the immune system and cell growth,” Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, vol. 20, no. 9, pp. 751–762, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. N. Petrovsky, L. Socha, D. Silva, A. B. Grossman, C. Metz, and R. Bucala, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor exhibits a pronounced circadian rhythm relevant to its role as a glucocorticoid counter-regulator,” Immunology & Cell Biology, vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 137–143, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. K. L. Meyer-Siegler and P. L. Vera, “Intraluminal antibodies to macrophage migration inhibitory factor decrease substance P induced inflammatory changes in the rat bladder and prostate,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 172, no. 4, part 1, pp. 1504–1509, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. T. Roger, A.-L. Chanson, M. Knaup-Reymond, and T. Calandra, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes innate immune responses by suppressing glucocorticoid-induced expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1,” European Journal of Immunology, vol. 35, no. 12, pp. 3405–3413, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. A. Javeed, Y. Zhao, and Y. Zhao, “Macrophage-migration inhibitory factor: role in inflammatory diseases and graft rejection,” Inflammation Research, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 45–50, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. L. Leng, C. N. Metz, Y. Fang et al., “MIF signal transduction initiated by binding to CD74,” The Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 197, no. 11, pp. 1467–1476, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. N. Rocha and J. Neefjes, “MHC class II molecules on the move for successful antigen presentation,” The EMBO Journal, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 1–5, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. C. J. Wraight, P. Van Endert, P. Moller et al., “Human major histocompatibility complex class II invariant chain is expressed on the cell surface,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 265, no. 10, pp. 5787–5792, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  14. X. Shi, L. Leng, T. Wang et al., “CD44 is the signaling component of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor-CD74 receptor complex,” Immunity, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 595–606, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. K. L. Meyer-Siegler and P. L. Vera, “Substance P induced changes in CD74 and CD44 in the rat bladder,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 173, no. 2, pp. 615–620, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. P. L. Vera, X. Wang, and K. L. Meyer-Siegler, “Upregulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and CD74, receptor for MIF, in rat bladder during persistent cyclophosphamide-induced inflammation,” Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 233, no. 5, pp. 620–626, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. D. Starlets, Y. Gore, I. Binsky et al., “Cell-surface CD74 initiates a signaling cascade leading to cell proliferation and survival,” Blood, vol. 107, no. 12, pp. 4807–4816, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. P. L. Vera and K. L. Meyer-Siegler, “Substance P induces localization of MIF/α1-inhibitor-3 complexes to umbrella cells via paracellular transit through the urothelium in the rat bladder,” BMC Urology, vol. 6, article 24, pp. 1–11, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. A. Maitra, I. I. Wistuba, A. K. Virmani et al., “Enrichment of epithelial cells for molecular studies,” Nature Medicine, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 459–462, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  20. P. L. Vera, R. C. Ordorica, and K. L. Meyer-Siegler, “Hydrochloric acid induced changes in macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the bladder, peripheral and central nervous system of the rat,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 170, no. 2, part 1, pp. 623–627, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  21. H. Lue, R. Kleemann, T. Calandra, T. Roger, and J. Bernhagen, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): mechanisms of action and role in disease,” Microbes and Infection, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 449–460, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. T. Calandra, J. Bernhagen, C. N. Metz et al., “MIF as a glucocorticoid-induced modulator of cytokine production,” Nature, vol. 377, no. 6544, pp. 68–71, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. R. A. Mitchell, C. N. Metz, T. Peng, and R. Bucala, “Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 activation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): regulatory role in cell proliferation and glucocorticoid action,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 274, no. 25, pp. 18100–18106, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. J. D. Richardson and M. R. Vasko, “Cellular mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation,” Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol. 302, no. 3, pp. 839–845, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. E. Lolis and R. Bucala, “Macrophage migration inhibitory factor,” Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 153–164, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. H. Veenstra, W. F. Ferris, and P. J. D. Bouic, “Major histocompatibility complex class II invariant chain expression in non-antigen-presenting cells,” Immunology, vol. 103, no. 2, pp. 218–225, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  27. B. Byrne, L. Madrigal-Estebas, A. McEvoy et al., “Human duodenal epithelial cells constitutively express molecular components of antigen presentation but not costimulatory molecules,” Human Immunology, vol. 63, no. 11, pp. 977–986, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar