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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 727305, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/727305
Research Article

12/15-Lipoxygenase Is an Interleukin-13 and Interferon- Counterregulated-Mediator of Allergic Airway Inflammation

Allergy-Immunology Division, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA

Received 6 May 2010; Revised 10 July 2010; Accepted 16 September 2010

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2010 Alexa R. Lindley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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