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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2010, Article ID 903295, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/903295
Review Article

Scorpion Venom and the Inflammatory Response

Laboratorio de Inflamación y Toxicología, Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Avenida Universidad 1001, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62209, Mexico

Received 19 November 2009; Accepted 4 January 2010

Academic Editor: Fulvio D'Acquisto

Copyright © 2010 Vera L. Petricevich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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