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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2011, Article ID 186093, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/186093
Review Article

Location, Location, Location: Is Membrane Partitioning Everything When It Comes to Innate Immune Activation?

1Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK
2Infection and Immunity Group, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK
3Department of Pneumology, Bern University Hospital (Inselspital), University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
4Department of Internal Medicine V-Pneumology, Allergology and Respiratory Critical Care Medicine, University Hospital of Saarland, 66424 Homburg, Germany

Received 22 November 2010; Accepted 27 March 2011

Academic Editor: Giamila Fantuzzi

Copyright © 2011 Martha Triantafilou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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