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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 740987, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/740987
Review Article

CXCR2 in Acute Lung Injury

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany

Received 5 March 2012; Revised 18 April 2012; Accepted 18 April 2012

Academic Editor: Dennis Daniel Taub

Copyright © 2012 F. M. Konrad and J. Reutershan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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