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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 258164, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/258164
Review Article

The Role of TL1A and DR3 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

1Clinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Nagasaki Medical Center, Kubara 2-1001-1, Omura 856-8562, Japan
2Department of Hepatology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Kubara 2-1001-1, Omura 856-8562, Japan
3Headquarters of PBC Research in NHOSLJ, Clinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Nagasaki Medical Center, Kubara 2-1001-1, Omura 856-8562, Japan

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 2 December 2013

Academic Editor: Linda Burkly

Copyright © 2013 Yoshihiro Aiba and Minoru Nakamura. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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