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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 275172, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/275172
Review Article

Influence of Mast Cells in Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

1Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Faculty of Dental Science, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai 600116, India
3Institute of Bioscience, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 2 October 2012; Revised 7 December 2012; Accepted 7 December 2012

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Valacchi

Copyright © 2013 Tamilselvan Subramani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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