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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 369693, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/369693
Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-4 Inhibits Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Expression in the Mouse Macrophage Cell Line RAW264.7 through the Repression of Octamer-Dependent Transcription

Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado 350-0283, Saitama, Japan

Received 31 October 2013; Revised 30 November 2013; Accepted 2 December 2013

Academic Editor: Elisabetta Buommino

Copyright © 2013 Miki Hiroi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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