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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 437576, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/437576
Research Article

Fractalkine (CX3CL1) and Its Receptor CX3CR1 May Contribute to Increased Angiogenesis in Diabetic Placenta

1Department of General & Experimental Pathology, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Ulica Krakowskie Przedmiescie 26/28, 00-928 Warsaw, Poland
2Department of Neurology, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Ulica Ceglowska 80, 01-809 Warsaw, Poland
3Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Ulica Kondratowicza 8, 03-242 Warsaw, Poland

Received 12 March 2013; Revised 12 June 2013; Accepted 26 June 2013

Academic Editor: Janusz Rak

Copyright © 2013 Dariusz Szukiewicz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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