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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 573576, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/573576
Research Article

Dysregulated Circulating Dendritic Cell Function in Ulcerative Colitis Is Partially Restored by Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota

1Antigen Presentation Research Group, Imperial College London, Northwick Park and St. Mark’s Campus, Level 7W St. Mark’s Hospital, Watford Road, Harrow HA1 3UJ, UK
2Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK
3Northwick Park Institute for Medical Research, Harrow, UK
4St. Mark’s Hospital, North West London Hospitals NHS Trust, Harrow, UK
5Yakult UK Ltd., West End Road, South Ruislip, UK

Received 4 February 2013; Revised 29 May 2013; Accepted 30 May 2013

Academic Editor: Eduardo Arranz

Copyright © 2013 Elizabeth R. Mann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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