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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 192790, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/192790
Review Article

Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

1Convergence Stem Cell Research Center, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan 626-870, Republic of Korea
2Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, and Physical Bioscience Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Received 27 December 2013; Accepted 18 March 2014; Published 27 May 2014

Academic Editor: Ryu-Ichiro Hata

Copyright © 2014 So Young Yoo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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