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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 347585, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/347585
Research Article

Anabolic Properties of High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells In Vitro

1Department of Orthodontics, University of Bonn, Welschnonnenstraße 17, 53111 Bonn, Germany
2Department of Orthodontics, University of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany
3Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Center for Pediatrics, University of Bonn Medical Center, Adenauerallee 119, 53113 Bonn, Germany
4Experimental Dento-Maxillo-Facial Medicine, University of Bonn, Welschnonnenstraße 17, 53111 Bonn, Germany

Received 8 July 2014; Accepted 18 August 2014; Published 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Alpdogan Kantarci

Copyright © 2014 Michael Wolf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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