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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 498395, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/498395
Research Article

Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodowa 106, 93-232 Lodz, Poland

Received 15 April 2014; Revised 18 June 2014; Accepted 20 June 2014; Published 8 July 2014

Academic Editor: Helen C. Steel

Copyright © 2014 Katarzyna Bednarska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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