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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 606383, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/606383
Review Article

Toll-Like Receptor 2 as a Regulator of Oral Tolerance in the Gastrointestinal Tract

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 1X5
2Dalhousie Inflammation Group, Dalhousie University, 5850 College Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 1X5

Received 13 June 2014; Revised 2 September 2014; Accepted 4 September 2014; Published 17 September 2014

Academic Editor: Flavio Caprioli

Copyright © 2014 Matthew C. Tunis and Jean S. Marshall. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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