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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 673032, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/673032
Research Article

Angiogenesis-Related Biomarkers in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease: Their Association with Liver Disease Complications and Outcome

1Department of Gastroenterology with Endoscopy Unit, Medical University of Lublin, 8 Jaczewski Street, 20-954 Lublin, Poland
2Department of Clinical Immunology, Medical University of Lublin, 4A Chodzki Street, 20-093 Lublin, Poland

Received 28 February 2014; Accepted 6 May 2014; Published 18 May 2014

Academic Editor: Steven B. Karch

Copyright © 2014 Beata Kasztelan-Szczerbinska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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