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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 803095, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/803095
Clinical Study

Urinary Eicosanoid Metabolites in HIV-Infected Women with Central Obesity Switching to Raltegravir: An Analysis from the Women, Integrase, and Fat Accumulation Trial

1Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
2Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29403, USA
3University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90035, USA
4Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
5Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA
6University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5R 0A3

Received 6 February 2014; Revised 10 May 2014; Accepted 11 May 2014; Published 1 June 2014

Academic Editor: Jonathan Peake

Copyright © 2014 Todd Hulgan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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