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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 896029, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/896029
Research Article

Cholecystokinin Inhibits Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

1Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida dos Bandeirantes 3900, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
2Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
3Departamento de Enfermagem Geral e Especializada, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, 14040-902 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 18 March 2014; Revised 26 May 2014; Accepted 23 June 2014; Published 13 July 2014

Academic Editor: Sandra Helena Penha Oliveira

Copyright © 2014 Rafael Simone Saia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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