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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 917149, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/917149
Research Article

Antagonizing Arachidonic Acid-Derived Eicosanoids Reduces Inflammatory Th17 and Th1 Cell-Mediated Inflammation and Colitis Severity

1Program in Integrative Nutrition & Complex Diseases, Center for Translational Environmental Health Research, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA
2Department of Nutrition & Food Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA
3Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA
4University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
5Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, College Station, TX, USA

Received 27 March 2014; Accepted 26 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2014 Jennifer M. Monk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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