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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 138461, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/138461
Research Article

iNOS Activity Modulates Inflammation, Angiogenesis, and Tissue Fibrosis in Polyether-Polyurethane Synthetic Implants

1Laboratório de Angiogênese e Células-Tronco, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3Laboratório de Angiogênese, Área de Ciências Fisiológicas-ARFIS, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38405-320 Uberlândia, MG, Brazil
4Laboratório de Imunologia e Mecânica Pulmonar, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 12 January 2015; Revised 28 April 2015; Accepted 28 April 2015

Academic Editor: Jan G. C. van Amsterdam

Copyright © 2015 Puebla Cassini-Vieira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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