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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 159269, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/159269
Review Article

Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Therapeutic Strategies in Cancer

Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0374, Japan

Received 26 January 2015; Accepted 23 March 2015

Academic Editor: Analía Trevani

Copyright © 2015 Hiroshi Katoh and Masahiko Watanabe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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