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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 243868, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/243868
Review Article

The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

1Research Division of Immunology, Departments of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
2Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 8 July 2015; Accepted 27 September 2015

Academic Editor: Carolina T. Piñeiro

Copyright © 2015 Corey R. Seehus and Jonathan Kaye. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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