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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 245308, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/245308
Research Article

Role of Polymorphisms of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Idiopathic Environmental Intolerances

1Centre of Innovative Biotechnological Investigations (Cibi-Nanolab), 197 Vernadskogo Prospekt, Moscow 119571, Russia
2Active Longevity Clinic “Institut Krasoty na Arbate”, 8 Maly Nikolopeskovsky lane, Moscow 119002, Russia
3Department of Biomedical Sciences and Morpho-Functional Imaging, Polyclinic University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
42nd Dermatology Division, Dermatology Institute (IDI IRCCS), Via dei Monti di Creta 104, 00167 Rome, Italy

Received 24 December 2014; Accepted 8 March 2015

Academic Editor: Oreste Gualillo

Copyright © 2015 Chiara De Luca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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