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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 378658, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/378658
Review Article

Chlamydia pneumoniae-Mediated Inflammation in Atherosclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

1Section of Microbiology, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, “Sapienza” University, Rome, Italy
2Section of Statistic, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, “Sapienza” University, Rome, Italy

Received 8 May 2015; Accepted 15 July 2015

Academic Editor: Uma Nagarajan

Copyright © 2015 Simone Filardo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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