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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 409596, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/409596
Review Article

Lactoferrin: A Modulator for Immunity against Tuberculosis Related Granulomatous Pathology

1UTHealth, Department of Pathology, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Program in Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 8 October 2015; Accepted 30 November 2015

Academic Editor: Magdalena Klink

Copyright © 2015 Jeffrey K. Actor. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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