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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 429653, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/429653
Research Article

Monocytic Tissue Transglutaminase in a Rat Model for Reversible Acute Rejection and Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

Department of General and Thoracic Surgery, Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Justus Liebig University Giessen, 35385 Giessen, Germany

Received 19 January 2015; Revised 1 April 2015; Accepted 1 April 2015

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2015 Anna Zakrzewicz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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