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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 630265, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/630265
Review Article

Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

Department of Microbiology and Department of Pu-Erh Tea and Medical Science, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya 663-8501, Japan

Received 10 June 2015; Accepted 27 September 2015

Academic Editor: Julio Galvez

Copyright © 2015 Hiroko Tsutsui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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