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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 762419, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/762419
Research Article

Effect of Crossing C57BL/6 and FVB Mouse Strains on Basal Cytokine Expression

1Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Krakow, Poland
2Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, 02-093 Warsaw, Poland
3Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Krakow, Poland

Received 15 January 2015; Accepted 9 February 2015

Academic Editor: Vera L. Petricevich

Copyright © 2015 Agata Szade et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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