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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 764250, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/764250
Review Article

Serum Uric Acid Increases Risk of Cancer Incidence and Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1Department of Surgical Oncology, The Eighty-First Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Nanjing 210002, China
2Liver Transplantation Center of the First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
3Department of Surgery Emergency, People’s Hospital of Rizhao, Rizhao 276800, China
4Center of Computer Network, People’s Hospital of Rizhao, Rizhao 276800, China
5Department of Cardiology, People’s Hospital of Rizhao, Rizhao 276800, China
6Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266003, China
7Department of Rheumatism, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China

Received 8 October 2014; Accepted 1 December 2014

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2015 Shushan Yan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

SUA is a potent antioxidant and thus may play a protective role against cancer. Many epidemiological studies have investigated this hypothesis but provided inconsistent and inconclusive findings. We aimed to precisely elucidate the association between SUA levels and cancer by pooling all available publications. Totally, 5 independent studies with 456,053 subjects and 12 with 632,472 subjects were identified after a comprehensive literature screening from PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. The pooled RRs showed that individuals with high SUA levels were at an increased risk of total cancer incidence (, 95% CI 1.01–1.05, ). Positive association between high SUA levels and total cancer incidence was observed in males but not females (for men: , 95% CI 1.02–1.08, ; for women, , 95% CI 0.98–1.04, ). Besides, high SUA levels were associated with an elevated risk of total cancer mortality (, 95% CI 1.04–1.32, ), particularly in females (, 95% CI 1.07–1.45, ). The study suggests that high SUA levels increase the risk of total cancer incidence and mortality. The data do not support the hypothesis of a protective role of SUA in cancer.