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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 924028, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/924028
Research Article

Modulation of Cytokines Production by Indomethacin Acute Dose during the Evolution of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor in Mice

1Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, São Paulo State University (UNESP), 18618-970 Botucatu, SP, Brazil
2Laboratory of Glycobiology, Carlos Chagas Filho Biophysics Institute (IBCCF), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Applied Pharmacology and Toxicology Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, 05508-900 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 25 May 2015; Revised 9 July 2015; Accepted 12 July 2015

Academic Editor: Mirella Giovarelli

Copyright © 2015 Luciana Boffoni Gentile et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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