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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 1363818, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1363818
Review Article

Neuroimmunomodulation in the Gut: Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

1Serviço de Gastroenterologia & Laboratório Multidisciplinar de Pesquisa, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-913 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR), 22281-100 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 30 March 2016; Accepted 7 June 2016

Academic Editor: Marisa I. Gómez

Copyright © 2016 Claudio Bernardazzi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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