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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 1784014, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1784014
Research Article

CETP Lowers TLR4 Expression Which Attenuates the Inflammatory Response Induced by LPS and Polymicrobial Sepsis

1Lipids Laboratory (LIM 10), Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Laboratory of Transplantation Immunobiology, Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Science IV, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Emergency Care Research Unit Laboratory (LIM 51), Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 1 February 2016; Revised 5 April 2016; Accepted 6 April 2016

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2016 Tatiana Martins Venancio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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