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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1942460, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1942460
Research Article

Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

1Medical Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland
2Institute for Sports Medicine, Ruprecht-Karls University of Heidelberg, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 22 March 2016; Accepted 12 May 2016

Academic Editor: Michal A. Rahat

Copyright © 2016 Matthias Peter Hilty et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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