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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 3501905, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3501905
Research Article

Decreased Interleukin-4 Release from the Neurons of the Locus Coeruleus in Response to Immobilization Stress

1Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Oriental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
2Department of Adult Health and Nursing Systems, School of Nursing, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0567, USA

Received 4 April 2015; Revised 2 July 2015; Accepted 17 December 2015

Academic Editor: Sun Wook Hwang

Copyright © 2016 Hyun-ju Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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