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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 3678152, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3678152
Clinical Study

Circulating Memory T Follicular Helper Cells in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica/Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders

1Department of Neurology and Neuroscience Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130000, China
2Genetic Diagnosis Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130000, China
3Key Laboratory for Zoonosis Research, Ministry of Education, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130000, China
4Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonosis, Yangzhou 225000, China
5Department of Neurology, The Hospital of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150000, China

Received 20 November 2015; Revised 14 February 2016; Accepted 17 February 2016

Academic Editor: Julio Galvez

Copyright © 2016 Xueli Fan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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