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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 3909614, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3909614
Research Article

Osteoclasts Are Required for Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Mobilization but Not for Stress Erythropoiesis in Plasmodium chabaudi adami Murine Malaria

Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada H3B 3H5

Received 28 October 2015; Accepted 27 December 2015

Academic Editor: Cesar Terrazas

Copyright © 2016 Hugo Roméro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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