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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4854378, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4854378
Research Article

Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor Mediates Nicotine-Induced Anti-Inflammation in N9 Microglial Cells Exposed to β Amyloid via Protein Kinase C

1Department of Anesthesiology, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou 510010, China
2Department of Anesthesiology, Wuhan General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Wuhan 430070, China

Received 17 October 2015; Revised 7 December 2015; Accepted 16 December 2015

Academic Editor: Magdalena Klink

Copyright © 2016 Ji Jia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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