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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 5240127, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5240127
Research Article

Folic Acid Is Able to Polarize the Inflammatory Response in LPS Activated Microglia by Regulating Multiple Signaling Pathways

1Department of Biosciences, Biotechnologies and Biopharmaceutics, University of Bari, Bari, Italy
2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy

Received 11 May 2016; Revised 28 July 2016; Accepted 11 August 2016

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2016 Antonia Cianciulli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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