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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 5830361, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5830361
Research Article

CRP and SAA1 Haplotypes Are Associated with Both C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A Levels: Role of Suppression Effects

1Department of Research, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei City 23142, Taiwan
2The Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei City 23142, Taiwan
3School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan
4The First Cardiovascular Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan
5Department of Life Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 11114, Taiwan

Received 9 October 2015; Accepted 24 April 2016

Academic Editor: Elaine Hatanaka

Copyright © 2016 Yu-Lin Ko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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