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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 7369351, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7369351
Research Article

mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

1Department of Hematology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology in Jiangxi Province, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China
2Medical Department of Nanchang University Graduate School, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China
3Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China
4State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China
5Department of Medical Microbiology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
6Department of Hematology and Oncology, The First Teaching Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China

Received 25 April 2016; Revised 5 August 2016; Accepted 11 August 2016

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2016 Lijun Fang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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