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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 8175898, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8175898
Research Article

Maternal Vitamin D Level Is Associated with Viral Toll-Like Receptor Triggered IL-10 Response but Not the Risk of Infectious Diseases in Infancy

1Community Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung 204, Taiwan
2Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung 204, Taiwan
3Division of Pulmonology, Department of Pediatric, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
4Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan 204, Taiwan
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung 204, Taiwan

Received 21 January 2016; Revised 14 April 2016; Accepted 27 April 2016

Academic Editor: Irving Allen

Copyright © 2016 Sui-Ling Liao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Reports on the effect of prenatal vitamin D status on fetal immune development and infectious diseases in childhood are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of maternal and cord blood vitamin D level in TLR-related innate immunity and its effect on infectious outcome. Maternal and cord blood 25 (OH)D level were examined from 372 maternal-neonatal pairs and their correlation with TLR-triggered TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 response at birth was assessed. Clinical outcomes related to infection at 12 months of age were also evaluated. The result showed that 75% of the pregnant mothers and 75.8% of the neonates were vitamin deficient. There was a high correlation between maternal and cord 25(OH)D levels (, ). Maternal vitamin D level was inversely correlated with IL-10 response to TLR3 () and TLR7-8 stimulation (). However, none of the TLR-triggered cytokine productions were associated with cord 25(OH)D concentration. There was no relationship between maternal and cord blood vitamin D status with infectious diseases during infancy. In conclusion, our study had shown that maternal vitamin D, but not cord vitamin D level, was associated with viral TLR-triggered IL-10 response.