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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 2034348, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2034348
Research Article

Bisphenol A Does Not Mimic Estrogen in the Promotion of the In Vitro Response of Murine Dendritic Cells to Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

1Laboratory of Dendritic Cell Biology, Department of Microbiology-Immunology, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
2Division of Rheumatology, Joseph Jr. Stokes Research Institute, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
3Department of Biology, Ursinus College, Collegeville, PA 19426, USA
4Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program, Ursinus College, Collegeville, PA 19426, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Stefania Gallucci; ude.elpmet@iccullag

Received 29 November 2016; Revised 25 April 2017; Accepted 5 June 2017; Published 25 July 2017

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2017 Marita Chakhtoura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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