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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 3264217, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3264217
Review Article

Advances in Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Comprehensive Review

1Dermatology Service, Hospital do Meixoeiro and University of Vigo, Vigo, Spain
2Department of Biochemistry, Genetics and Immunology, University of Vigo, Vigo, Spain
3Mycology Service, Hospital Manuel Gea González, Mexico City, Mexico
4Health Department, Xunta Galicia, Vigo, Spain
5Galician Healthcare Service, Vigo, Spain
6Dermatology Service, University of Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
7Dermatology Service, Venus Clinic, Tirana, Albania
8Dermatology Service, Military Medical Unit, University Trauma Hospital, Tirana, Albania

Correspondence should be addressed to Carmen Rodríguez-Cerdeira; se.ogivu@recdorc

Received 16 December 2016; Revised 21 March 2017; Accepted 3 April 2017; Published 1 August 2017

Academic Editor: Rajesh Singh

Copyright © 2017 Carmen Rodríguez-Cerdeira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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