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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 4308684, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4308684
Research Article

Mold Alkaloid Cytochalasin D Modifies the Morphology and Secretion of fMLP-, LPS-, or PMA-Stimulated Neutrophils upon Adhesion to Fibronectin

1A. N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119234, Russia
2Physical Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119234, Russia

Correspondence should be addressed to Svetlana I. Galkina; us.usm.eebeneg@aniklag

Received 18 January 2017; Revised 11 April 2017; Accepted 27 April 2017; Published 27 June 2017

Academic Editor: Magdalena Klink

Copyright © 2017 Svetlana I. Galkina et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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